Food-Poisoning

 

In the latest Safety Report edition, our CEO Ellie Cachette shared her thoughts.

What Scares Me The Most: Tales of an Everyday Consumer by: Ellie Cachette

Just because I might be on the initiating side of information—often hearing stories weeks before they are announced–it doesn’t make me immune from being the average consumer; I am one, after all. As a Humboldt State grad, I tend to stick on organic produce and things locally made.People often think that, as someone working for a health-minded and product-recall-focused company, I am somehow immune to the dangers or concerns that plague everyday consumers.

I’ve lived in small towns and even when roaming the streets of Manhattan, I try my best to always find that “mom-and-pop-shop” but at the end of the day I eat like most people, drink like most people and buy products for my apartment just like any other person. I know more areas to look for and, in some ways, this makes purchases an even bigger decision than normal. Maybe I’m paranoid, but I overvalue my health.

Here are five examples that scare me the most as a consumer, that I think about more than I should, and that I worry about for others too.

1. Eating a meal, getting sick, and having NO IDEA what did it.

           I once almost killed myself when I cooked a delicious dinner. Everyone at the table that night nearly died, spending the next two days with food poisoning.

Living on my own, it was frightening to think I was too sick to go to the hospital. It took months of cooking at home, and getting sick two more times, to realize it was my fish oil, a condiment seasoning which is merely an auxiliary ingredient.

I was caught off guard. Luckily, I had a label to confirm it was expired. Have you ever cooked a meal and seen all the trash and wrappers that came with it, all those wrappers laying at the top of the trash can?

Those things could have life-saving information. How do we easily track what’s coming into our homes and bodies?

2. Using a faulty product

            There is truth to “fear of the unknown”. For some reason, the fear of using a faulty product while not knowing it is faulty scares me even more than food because almost anything could be faulty. Is my cold-medicine contaminated? Is the chair I’m sitting on put together properly? Will I ever pick up a pan in the kitchen only to watch the handle fall off? I’m terrified that at any moment what I’m using could be faulty and even worse is not knowing if that message would reach me anyway if news about the product was out.

3. Getting a rare disease, from medicine

Let’s face it, very few diseases are coming up from genetic mutation; however, rare diseases and some diseases that shouldn’t even be able to access certain areas (say like a meat disease being found in vegetables) are happening more than ever. My greatest fear is spending massive amounts of time and money with doctors in hospitals and almost never knowing why or what the cause is from.

4. Anything involving “personal areas”

            Women already have enough to think about related to our reproductive and physical health. It doesn’t matter if it’s birth control, contraceptives, condoms, oil, tampons, cleanser—if it goes below the belly button, I’m absolutely terrified of something going wrong.

5. Getting the news too late

            What’s worse than never getting the news? Getting it too late. My ultimate fear is that someone gets word of their recalled items right after consumption or after a major issue. I’d prefer we all have the chance to double-check something before use, but if the damage cannot be recovered or the side-effect is longstanding, it scares me to think about getting the right information minutes after consuming or using something.

The world is a big place, and with different publishing technologies coming out, news spreads faster than ever. Get educated. Read our blog at blog.consumerbell.com. Check out our Twitter. By staying current, you will be safer and healthier—and the world may not be nearly as scary a place.

For the original article at The Safety Report